Close

History

History

 

Information is provided courtesy of Wikipedia

The Woodbridge Neighborhood Historic District is a historic neighborhood of primarily Victorian homes

DESCRIPTION:

located in Detroit, Michigan. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, with later boundary increases in 1997 and 2008.

The district as recognized by the National Register of Historic Places was originally bounded by Trumbull Street, Calumet Street, Gibson Street, Grand River Avenue, Rosa Parks Boulevard, West Warren Avenue, Wabash Street, Railroad Tracks, and the Edsel Ford Freeway. The boundaries of the District were increased twice: in 1997, 4304-14 Trumbull Street (private residences) and 3800 Grand River Avenue were added to the district, and in 2008 the southeast corner of Trumbull Street and Warren Avenue (Saint Dominic Roman Catholic Church) was added.

Most structures in the district are located on north-south streets. The irregularly-shaped district would include structures:

  • On the east side of Wabash street, on both sides of Vermont Street, and on both sides of Rosa Parks Boulevard from the Edsel Ford Freeway to Warren Avenue.
  • On the west side of Rosa Parks Boulevard from Warren Avenue to Grand River Avenue.
  • On both sides of Hecla Street, Avery Street, and Commonwealth Street from the Edsel Ford Freeway to Grand River Avenue.
  • On the west side of Trumbull Street from the Edsel Ford Freeway to Canfield Street.
  • On the east side of Trumbull Street at the south corner of Warren Avenue.
  • On both sides of Trumbull Street from Canfield Street to Grand River Avenue.
  • On both sides of Lincoln Street and the west side of Gibson Street from Calumet Street to Grand River Avenue.
  • The structure at 3800 Grand River Avenue (between Avery Street and Commonwealth Street).

REDEVELOPMENT:

After the war, residents began leaving the Woodbridge neighborhood for homes in the suburbs. New residents to Woodbridge were less affluent. In the 1960s, the city cleared areas adjacent to the neighborhood to support revitalization. The residents of Woodbridge organized a Citizen’s District Council to preserve the neighborhood, and successfully managed to stabilize and preserve many of the remaining homes. Recent activity has shifted perception of Woodbridge to that of an up-and-coming neighborhood.